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Entenda o Ontario Elementary School Report Card

Uma amiga me falou deste artigo publicado no Toronto Sun do dia 27 de Fevereiro de 2009 e como sei que é de interesse de todos os pais e para quem está pensando em comprar um imóvel aqui no Ontario, resolvi publica-lo aqui também. Abaixo o artigo:

Use the sample table and the explanation of each line below to help you interpret the detailed results for individual schools. Families choosing a school for their children should seek to confirm the Report Card’s findings by visiting the school and interviewing teachers, school administrators, and other parents. The complete Report Card can be downloaded free of charge from The Fraser Institute’s web site at http://www.fraserinstitute.org. More information regarding test results at individual schools can be found on the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) web site at http://www.eqao.com and on the web sites of local school districts and schools. Of course, a sound academic program should be complemented by effective programs in areas of school activity not measured by the Report Card.

Private schools are not required to administer the EQAO tests. Since the Report Card is based on results achieved on these tests, only a few private schools that chose to administer the EQAO tests could be included. Schools that offer only French Immersion instruction and that do not fully participate in the grade 3 tests do not appear in the report card. For schools that offer both French Immersion and English programs whose French Immersion students do not fully participate in the grade 3 tests, the grade three results that we report reflect only the performance of the students in the English language stream.

IMPORTANT: In order to get the most from the Report Card, readers should consult the complete table of results for each school of interest. By considering several years of results- rather than just a school’s rank in the most recent year-readers can get a better idea of how the school is likely to perform in the future.

A – The school name, its affiliation-public, Catholic, or private-and the city in which the school is located.

B – The average parental employment income (from wages, salaries and self-employment income) of the students’ families. Higher values of this statistic are commonly thought to be associated with better student performance. Use this statistic to identify schools at which the students’ families share roughly similar family socioeconomic characteristics.

C (left) – The number of students eligible to participate in the grade-6 tests. Indicator results for schools with small enrollments tend to be more variable than do those for larger schools. For this reason it is particularly important to consider previous results as well as those for the most recent year.

C (right) – The school’s overall academic rank in the province for 2007/2008 and during the most recent five years. The rankings show how the school has done academically compared to the other schools in the province. A high ranking over five years indicates consistently strong results at the school.

D to J – The average level achieved by the students on the grade-3 and grade-6 EQAO tests. The EQAO assigns a level of achievement to each completed test. Achievement at Levels 1 and 2 suggest that the student has not yet met the provincial standard. Level 3 is considered the provincial standard and Level 4 represents achievement well above the provincial standard. Thus, achievement at Level 3 or 4 suggests that students are well prepared for work at the next grade. In order to calculate the average level, a numerical value was given to each level of achievement. Thus, Level 1 was given a value of 1 for purposes of determining the average; Level 2, a value of 2; Level 3, a value of 3; and Level 4, a value of 4. In those cases where a student completed the test but did not demonstrate sufficient understanding to be assigned achievement Level 1, the test was given a value of 0.

J & K – The difference in average level of achievement between girls and boys in the grade-6 reading and mathematics tests. Where the difference favours the girls, the value is preceded by an F. Where boys are favoured, the value is preceded by an M. An E means that there is no difference between the girls and the boys on this measure. Smaller differences indicate that the school is doing a good job for all its students.

L – The percentage of all the completed tests written by students at the school that were judged to be below Level 3. A low percentage of Tests below standard (%) indicates that the school is ensuring that most of its students are meeting or exceeding the provincial standard of performance for the grade.

M – The percentage of the tests that could have been completed by the school’s students but which were not assigned an overall score. The percentage, Tests not written, takes into account tests not written by students for whom no results were received by the EQAO or who were exempt from writing the tests. Schools that administer these tests are expected to ensure that all their students participate. For this reason, you should take note of the Tests not written percentage when you consider each school’s results in the Report Card. The principal of a school with a high Tests not written percentage should be able to provide good reasons for the students’ failure to complete the tests.

N & O – These are estimates of the school’s contribution to its students’ results on the grade-6 reading and mathematics tests. Schools that have a strong positive impact on their students receive an A for this indicator. Those that receive a B or a C may have some positive impact on their students. Schools that have little positive impact receive a D.

P – The Overall rating out of 10 takes into account the nine indicators described in E through M above to answer the question, “In general, how is the school doing academically compared with other schools in the Report Card?”

Q – An upward-pointing arrow at the end of an indicator row means that the school is probably improving on that indicator. A downward-pointing arrow means that the school is probably getting worse. The researchers had to be at least 90% sure that changes were not just random before indicating a trend. A dash indicates that there is no significant change. Where insufficient data were available, “n/a” appears in the column. Note that for the two Gender gap indicators, Tests below standard and, Tests not written, a downward trend in the data will lead to an upward-pointing arrow in the trend column. For example, a decreasing Tests below standard (%) indicates improvement and so an upward-pointing arrow is displayed.

Other notes

Note 1
Not all the province’s elementary schools are included in the tables or the ranking. In some school districts that operate middle schools or junior high schools, the elementary schools may not enroll students in grade 6. Since the Report Card is based on the results of tests given in grades 3 and 6, these elementary schools cannot be included. In addition, schools at which fewer than 15 students were enrolled in each of these grades are excluded. Private schools and federally funded schools operated by First Nations are not required to administer the EQAO tests. Since the results of these tests form the basis for this Report Card, only those schools that administer the EQAO tests could be included. Schools that offer only French Immersion instruction and that do not fully participate in the grade 3 tests do not appear in the report card. For schools that offer both French Immersion and English programs whose French Immersion students do not fully participate in the grade 3 tests, the grade three results that we report reflect only the performance of the students in the English language stream. Finally, also excluded are schools that did not generate a sufficiently large set of student data to enable the calculation of an Overall rating out of 10.

The exclusion of a school from the Report Card should not be considered a judgement of the school’s effectiveness.

Note 2
The EQAO’s test results, student enrollment data, and school information used or reported in this publication were provided by the Ontario Ministry of Education. The results or views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and are not those of the Ontario Ministry of Education.

Note 3
Due to continuing improvements in methodology, some historical values for indicators and overall ratings may differ from those previously reported.

Note 4
In accordance with its regulations regarding the privacy of personal information, where the results in a test involved fewer than 15 students, the EQAO provided no data.

Note 5
Where there were insufficient data available with which to calculate an indicator or where a school was not in operation during a specific year, “n/a” appears in the tables.

Note 6
If you have questions about the Report Card, contact Peter Cowley, Director of School Performance Studies at The Fraser Institute at 604-714-4556.

 

março 11, 2009 - Posted by | Assuntos Gerais

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